NOTE: As of 2022 the Center for Executive Coaching is now accredited with the ICF as a Level 2 Coach Training Organization. The ICF has changed their language and replaced ACTP with Level 2. We were among the first group of coach training programs to receive this accreditation, after a rigorous review by the ICF.

How to write executive coaching proposals that close engagements

Please enjoy a recording of our Masterclass about how to write executive coaching proposals that close engagements. Many certified executive coaches make mistakes throughout the business development cycle. One is that they spend far too much time proposing to prospects that will never buy from them. If you seek executive coaching certification, you should join an organization that teaches you best practice coaching competencies and ALSO how to establish a successful practice. The video that follows shows you an approach that works very well and that more successful leadership and executive coaches (and consultants for that matter) rely on to close engagements. If you like this content, please consider getting executive coaching certification with us. See our distance learning/online program and our seminar certification program. Here is an executive summary:
  • First and foremost: Never write a proposal unless the client writes it with you. Otherwise, you will be trying to read their mind.
  • Second: Ask the client, “If I summarize this for you in a couple of pages and it fits what we discussed, what happens next?” If they don’t say they will move forward, you don’t need to take more time writing the proposal.
  • Cover the following with the client BEFORE submitting a written proposal, to be sure they are on board:
    • One: why?
      • Problem?
      • Outcomes from the coaching?
      • Benefits if addressed?
    • Two: budget?
      • What is the client willing to invest?
      • Process to get funding.
      • Who else is involved?
    • Three: scope?
      • Start and end?
      • Frequency of meetings?
      • Assessments included?
      • Other delivery modalities, for instance, facilitation or team coaching?
    • Four: terms.
      • Confidentiality
      • Payment
      • Cancellation
      • Other client responsibilities
    • Five: acceptance.
      • If I write this up and it reflects what I want, what happens next?
      • If client disagrees no need to move forward.
      • As almost every sales book ever written advises, “Close before you propose.”

Aflac

Amazon

Ancestry

Army Corp of Engineers

Ascension Health

AT&T

Bank of America

Bechtel

Best Buy

Booz Allen

Bose

Bristol-Myers Squibb

Brown University

Capital One

Caterpillar

Charles Schwab & Co.

Children’s Hospital Colorado

Cisco

Citrix

Coca-Cola

Deloitte

Dropbox

Duke Energy

Galveston Independent School District

General Atomics

General Electric

Google

Harvard Business School

Home Depot

Inland Steel

International Red Cross

Johnson and Johnson

Kaiser-Permanente

KPMG

Laser Spine Institute

Lexis Nexis

Liberty Mututal

L’Oreal

Macy’s

Mckinsey Consulting

Merck

Microsoft

MIT

NASA

National Basketball Association (NBA)

Nike

Nissan

Nvidia

Partners Healthcare

Philips

Procter & Gamble

Price Waterhouse Coopers (PWC)

Ralph Lauren

Regeneron

Rice University

Ross Stores

Russell Reynolds Associates

Schneider Electric

Shell Oil

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Stryker

The Ohio State University

Tom’s Shoes

United Nations

University of Florida

Unum

UPS

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USAID

Valassis

VMWare

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